New in April

Notes from a Wayward Son: A Miscellany

by Andrew Walker

Out on 30/04/2020

“The second edition of Notes from a Wayward Son highlights the ground-breaking work of Andrew Walker, bringing together his expertise in sociology and his commitment to orthodox trinitarian theology.”

Pete Ward, Professor of Practical Theology, Durham University

This ‘miscellany’ puts readers around the table with a teacher who has provided the church with wisdom and passion, allowing us to hear an important contribution to the ongoing conversation about the relationship between the gospel and culture. Andrew Walker’s ‘ecclesial intelligence’ and broad interdisciplinary approach to theology and sociology will undoubtedly capture the imagination of many who are curious about the church’s mission in the modern West. Notes from a Wayward Son represents a broad sampling of Walker’s writings from a distinguished forty-five-year career – from explorations of Pentecostalism and Charismatic Renewal to Eastern Orthodoxy, C.S. Lewis, and Deep Church; from the impact of modernity on the ecclesia to mission and ecumenism in the West today. In a world and a church often driven by the latest fashions, Walker’s is a voice to which we will want to listen!

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Come Out from among Them, and Be Ye Separate, Saith the Lord: Separationism and the Believers’ Church Tradition

By William H. Brackney and Evan L. Colford (editors)

Out on 30/04/2020

As a corollary to the 500th anniversary of the Radical Reformation, here is a collection of fresh and scholarly essays that carefully underscores General and Particular Baptists, Black Baptists, Mennonites, Hutterites, Pentecostals, and other Restorationist movements. Taking their cue from the great Brethren historian, Donald Durnbaugh, this nonsectarian volume elucidates the meaning of the Believers’ Church tradition.

Chris Chun, Professor of Church History and Director of Jonathan Edwards Center, Gateway Seminary

Believers’ Churches have their origin in the Radical Reformation of the sixteenth century. Over the past 450 years, the movement has included the Brethren, Mennonites, Hutterites, various types of Baptists, and the Restoration Movement.

The Believers’ Churches together have been characterized by a strong personal faith in Christ, a call to discipleship and Christian activism, a high view of the authority of Scripture, and profession of faith in believers’ baptism. The Believers’ Churches have represented their beliefs in various ecumenical settings, missionary gatherings, and theological conversations. In the late 1950s, representatives of the several Believers’ Churches began to meet in a series of conferences to explore their common views on doctrine, history, and ethics. Topics at the conferences have included baptism, the Lord’s Supper, the nature of the church, and religious voluntarism.

In 2016, the 17th Believers’ Church Conference was held at Acadia University and sponsored by Acadia Divinity College. The theme was ‘The Tendency Toward Separationism Among the Believers’ Churches’. This volume includes the papers presented at the conference and examines the theme from an immediate post-Reformation perspective, with analyses provided by leading historians, theologians, and social science specialists.

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Luther as Heretic: Ten Catholic Responses to Martin Luther, 1518–1541

By M. Patrick Graham and David Bagchi (editors)

Out on 30/04/2020

Ten Catholic critics of Luther and the Reformation come to brilliant light and life in this excellent collection of texts, newly translated into English and crisply introduced. Scholars and students alike of the Reformation and Counter-Reformation will learn from these striking examples of rhetorical and theological hardball played at a furious pace.

John Witte Jr, Emory University

The publication of Martin Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses in 1517 immediately elicited responses from dozens of Roman Catholics in Germany and beyond. While Luther’s works and those of his leading supporters have been available in English translation for many years, those of most of his Catholic opponents have not. In order to address this imbalance, win a fairer hearing for the Catholic opposition, and make it possible for students to understand both sides of the sixteenth-century religious debates, translators have drawn on the rich resources of the Kessler Reformation Collection at the Pitts Theology Library to present here introductions to and translations of ten Catholic pamphlets.

Luther as Heretic begins with an essay sketching the larger background for these publications. The editors’ goal is that this book will prove useful for teaching and research and will foster a deeper understanding of the sixteenth-century theological discussions by allowing today’s readers to hear voices that have been mostly silent in the English-speaking world for centuries.

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